Walt’s ashes will be inurned at Fort Logan National Cemetery on April 22, 2019, at 2 p.m. Attendees will gather at Staging Area A at 1:30. This area is off the north gate entrance to Fort Logan on Sheridan Blvd. just south of Hampden Blvd. Afterward, there will be a gathering at the home in Parker.

No flowers, please. Donations to the National Diabetes Association or the charity of your choice.

Call 303-881-4239 for more information.

Walter John Keller

In Loving Memory
Born:
July 20, 1946 :: Denver, Colorado
Passed Away:
December 12, 2018 :: Parker, Colorado
Committal Service

Walt’s ashes will be inurned at Fort Logan National Cemetery on April 22, 2019, at 2 p.m. Attendees will gather at Staging Area A at 1:30. This area is off the north gate entrance to Fort Logan on Sheridan Blvd. just south of Hampden Blvd. Afterward, there will be a gathering at the home in Parker.

No flowers, please. Donations to the National Diabetes Association or the charity of your choice.

Call 303-881-4239 for more information.

     

Walt was born in Denver to parents Joseph F. Keller and Delouise Conover Keller who preceded him in death. Two things he was proud of was being a native Coloradan and a first-year member of the Baby Boom generation. He attended various schools in the Denver area and also spent three years at St. Michaels School in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This led to a deep love for the northern New Mexico area and especially its food. He completed his high school education at St. Francis de Sales in Denver graduating in 1964. He attended the 50th reunion of his class in 2014.

Walt had a deeply spiritual nature and decided to enter religious life after his high school graduation. Based on his experiences at St. Michaels which was a Christian Brothers school, he went to Louisiana to study for the brotherhood. However, he quickly realized that this was not a calling he wanted to commit his life to and left before taking his final vows. He instead chose to continue to study many religious and spiritual paths throughout the rest of his life finding true spirituality in all.

After his return to Denver, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy as his father had during WWII. He was stationed in Morocco as a communications technician. He also became involved with the Boy Scout troop formed there. One of Walt’s many talents was the practice of magic and he enjoyed being able to perform his magic tricks whenever possible, including for the Boy Scouts. He was still in contact with friends he made while in Morocco.

After his return to Denver in 1969, he worked at several jobs, including a stint as a cab driver which is why he memorized Denver street names and their locations and could tell you years later which street intersected S. Broadway at 2800 South when you needed to know. He also loved woodworking and for many years worked with his father making wonderful wood items that they sold throughout Colorado. He worked briefly at Rocky Flats where his father worked and Walt made life-long friends there also.

In 1979, when the Iran Hostage crisis began, Walt decided to reenlist in the Navy and make it a career this time. He had a gift for languages, especially non-Roman languages, and he was sent to the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, California, for a year-long study of Farsi (Persian) which is spoken in Iran. He graduated with fluency for reading and speaking Farsi that astounded native speakers whenever he would speak to them in their native language. He was sent to the Persian Gulf where he served on several ships, including his favorite, the USS Coronado. However, his dream of a career came to an end when he was diagnosed with insulin-dependent diabetes during his reenlistment physical. He was immediately sent to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C., and given a full medical discharge. He returned to Denver in 1983 where his life was to change again in a totally unexpected way.

At this same time, a childhood friend (and sweetheart as he always insisted) also returned to Colorado and Walt reconnected with Gisela Hauert. They had been neighbors in South Denver and met when they were 7 and 8 years old. They began dating that September and were engaged on New Year’s Eve 1983/4 and married on April 21, 1984.

Walt and Gisela moved to Parker, Colorado, in 1986 and he worked as an office administrator and technical writer/project manager until he retired in 2007. After Gisela retired in 2009, they enjoyed traveling to many countries including two remarkable trips to celebrate 30 years of marriage (and 60 years of knowing each other). The first was a 49-day cruise from Seattle across the Pacific to Australia/New Zealand with another 10 days to see the Outback on a camping trip from Alice Springs to Uluru (Ayers Rock). The second trip was a Grand European River Boat Cruise from Amsterdam to Budapest with a stay in Prague. They also got to visit with Gisela’s remaining family in Germany. Later, they also traveled to China and Tibet (Walt said that he never imagined he’d get to walk on the Great Wall of China) and they had a wonderful last trip together in April 2018 cruising from Barcelona to the Baltic with a fantastic stop in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Throughout most of his life, Walt’s very favorite pastime was cooking. He was the cook in the family and worked culinary magic with everything he created. He was always happy and content when he was elbow deep in whatever he was making. All who got to enjoy them will miss his wonderful meals.

Walt had excellent control of his diabetes from the time he was diagnosed until just a short time before he passed. But the disease is insidious and he died of a severe diabetic episode in his sleep on December 12, 2018, at his home in Parker.

Walt is survived by his loving and beloved wife Gisela Hauert of Parker, and family and friends in Colorado, California, Oregon, New Mexico, and Kentucky and other states too numerous to mention.

 

 

13 Responses to Walter John Keller

  1. William Wright says:

    Once again I am forced to hunt mammoth alone … Gonna miss ya Hoss

  2. Robert W. "Doc" Boyle says:

    Many long talks about many things. A questing intellect and a very special man.

  3. Kathy and Mark says:

    What a wonderful life and gentleman!

  4. Alida L Franco says:

    Walt had a sharp intellect and was a wonderful colleague.

  5. Carol Carpenter-Mollo says:

    Heaven is waiting to welcome you, dear Walt. The ferrets and kitties you so loved during this lifetime are eager to be held in your arms once again. But on this Earth, each person who knew you will miss your charming wit, wise counsel, and constant-as-the-stars friendship.

  6. Donald and Beverly Keler says:

    Our sincere and deepest condolences to the family and Gisela on their loss of Walter.

  7. Michael Mollo says:

    I’ll never forget the first time I met Walt. Gisela and Walt took Carol and I to this restaurant in Denver, and he insisted I need to wear a tie. As soon as I sat down the hostess came over with a big pair of scissors and cut that tie right off of me!

  8. Bonnie J. Hamilton says:

    Walt was truly a gentle man. Very considerate of others. I too miss him coming out to the car when I was there to pick up Gisela for our monthly luncheons with the IHS girls. I love you Walt.

  9. Sandy Savino says:

    I was so lucky to have known Walt.

  10. Pat Frankenbery says:

    I was truly a pleasure and an honor to know this kind and gentle man.

  11. Kathy and Ross Beesing says:

    We are so sorry for your loss, Gisela. Walt was obviously a lovely and much beloved man. Sorry we can’t be there. You will be in our thoughts.

  12. Barbara Foster says:

    So sorry for your loss, Gisela. What a inspiring life story.

  13. Rich Adams says:

    We were as close as Brothers. We learned to respect and be mindful of the spiritual paths we chose and embraced. Now we’ll be meeting where faith and spirituality cross paths, and I can hardly wait! In the meantime, I will speak your name with love and visit your memories with happiness. Whashsta, Brother!

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